Humanity in Action Fellowship in Warsaw: 2015 Agenda

The theme for the 2015 Humanity in Action Felowship in Warsaw is "Incubator of Ideas. Transformation, Democracy and Human Rights." 

Input Phase

May 30

Opening of the 2015 Fellowship: WELCOME! Let’s Get to Know Each Other

This day is conceived as a smooth transition of all participants into the program: all fellows who the day before will first of all have an opportunity to adapt to a new environment in Warsaw, to reenergize after the travel and to get to know each other informally, whereas later in the morning the fellows will have a chance to get to know each other in a program setting especially during the first session. In the second session there will be a chance to continue the process of introducing each other by sharing personal experiences in human rights work. The third program element is a guided walk tour through Warsaw in order to explore especially how history of Warsaw is interconnected with Polish history and what are the links between past and present. At the  end of the day we would like to invite everybody for a welcome dinner. The aims of the day are to get to know each other and to familiarize with the nearest environment.

  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director 
  • ‘Facebook Live‘: Who Is Who, HIA Poland staff
  • Let’s Talk about You as Human Rights Activists, HIA Poland staff
  • (In)Visible History and Vibrant Present in the Streets of Warsaw, Guided tour through Warsaw, part 1 with Adrian Grycuk, guide
  • Free time and informal networking
  • Welcome Dinner and Get-Together

May 31

Let's Get to Know the Fellowship

The second program day is devoted to exploring the program in a more detailed way, to clarifying the expectations and to agreeing upon the ‘rules of the game’. It consists of 3 sessions. In the first session there will be a short introduction to the program by the HIA staff and a discussion on expectations. In the second session the group will discuss and agree upon rules/obligations during the program in form of a contract. Additionally, the staff will provide some practical information about the stay in Warsaw (transportation, health, safety, etc.).The third program element is the second part of the guided walk tour through Warsaw, this time in the Praga district which will give some ideas on how ethnic/religious diversity in Poland might have looked like in the past.

  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director 
  • Let’s Talk about the Fellowship, HIA Poland staff
  • Let’s Talk about You in the Fellowship, HIA Poland staff
  • (In)Visible History and Vibrant Present in the Streets of Warsaw - Guided tour through Warsaw, part 2 with Adrian Grycuk, guide
  • Free time and informal networking 

June 1

Creating the “Other” - Main Ingredients: Prejudices & Stereotypes
 
The day starts with a debriefing session after a guided-tour walk through Warsaw’s streets. Then, content-wise the day is dedicated to exploring how social psychology explains the most probable universal mechanisms that lead to discrimination, violence and hate speech. Our goal is to make the fellows aware of the key paradigms of social psychology regarding the ‘human nature’. Furthermore, during the third session the fellows will be introduced into ‘discrimination landscape’ in Poland. After the discussion of these new insights the HIA Poland staff will present how Humanity in Action Poland has contributed to pre-empting prejudice and the promotion of human rights ideals/culture through its activities/initiatives.
 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director
  • ‘Warsaw-Book’ – sharing impressions from the guided tour through Warsaw – Fellows’ Discussion
  • Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director, Przemysław Iwanek, HIA Poland, Project Manager
  • Prejudices & Stereotypes vs. Hate Speech: What Leads to What?, Michał Bilewicz, PhD, Center for Research of Prejudice, Warsaw University
  • Lunch Break
  • Discrimination in Poland: a Big Picture, Ewa Rutkowska, Association of Anti-discrimination Education
  • Fellows' Discussion
  • Pre-empting Prejudice: Raising Awareness and Instigating Change by HIA Network & HIA Poland, HIA Poland staff 
  • Summary & Closing

June 2

Socialism, Resistance and the Roman Catholic Church 
 
The day will help the participants to explore the role of the  Roman-Catholic Church in the Polish history and today. In the past it often served as a sort of real and symbolic asylum/shelter for the people who disagreed with a given regime in various ways and also actively contested it. Additionally, during Socialism people who disagreed with the uniform Communist Party-line organized the  Solidarity movement, while the Church tried to keep the society together against the common enemy – the ruling regime. As much as it enabled to exercise some sort of freedom (personal, artistic and the like) and mobilizing resistance, it looked for ways of strengthening ‘Polishness’ and being together on particular terms. After 1989 the situation has deeply changed and the Roman Catholic Church needs to ‘compete’ on the free ‘market’ of diverse ideas. How does the Church meet this challenge? Moreover, the fellows will also focus on the Socialist regime in Poland: the movie projection will serve as a base for discussion on how human rights were violated and how the members of the Polish society resisted the unjust regime.  
 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director
  • Religion, Poles and the Roman-Catholic Church with Sebastian Duda, PhD, philosopher and theologist and Professor Tadeusz Zieliński, The Christian Theological Academy in Warsaw
  • Real-Socialism in Poland: Movie Screening
  • Discussion on real-socialist system in Poland presented in the movie
  • Output Phase: Why, What, When and How?, HIA Poland staff
  • Fellows’ Discussion
  • Summary & Closing

June 3

Significant 'Others': Poles & Jews and the Notion of "Polishness"
 
In contrast to Western Europe, after WWII Poland turned from a very diverse country into a more homogenous one due to the war, the Holocaust and the communist policy to eradicate any form of social difference. As diversity was a challenge even before the WWII (the Second Polish Republic was a state struggling with consequences of diversity), communist propaganda managed to brain-wash many Poles that the newly ‘introduced’ homogeneity was not only good but also one of the successes in this part of the world. After over 45 years of living in a communist/socialist freezer with very limited freedom of speech, Polish society is facing several challenges resulting from a more visible and growing diversity. 
 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director
  • Museum of the History of Polish Jews: Inside Out with Professor Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Museum of the History of Polish Jews
  • Sightseeing: the Core Exhibition, Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Polin, Part 1
  • Core Exibition: Sharing Impressions with Monika Koszyńska, Manager of the Children and Youth Education Unit at the POLIN Museum; Regional Consultant in Poland for the USC Shoah Foundation - The Institute for Visual History and Education
  • Sightseeing: the Core Exhibition of the Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Polin, Part 2: Individual time
  • Fellows’ Discussion
  • Summary & Closing

June 4

From Hate to Extermination: Genocide Step by Step
 
With reference to the first semi-free elections to the Polish Parliament on June 4, 1989 Poles celebrate 26 years of (regained) freedom. Notwithstanding, in the context of the project the fellows will firstly have the chance to deepen the historical knowledge on WWII as well as the Holocaust that was carried out by Nazi Germany on Polish territory. The historical realities of those times will be reanimated with the help of a documentary film on the Warsaw Ghetto. A film screening and site visit to Treblinka will lead to discussions on the relevance and legacy of the Holocaust as well as on linkages with other genocides and possible actions to prevent genocides. Secondly, the day is also thought out as an opportunity to commemorate the victims as well as an opportunity for personal reflection on this chapter of history and its relevance today.
 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director
  • Seeing is Believing – “The Warsaw Ghetto 1940-1943”, Jewish Historical Institute documentary movie Sharing Impressions, facilitated by Tomasz Cebulski, PhD, guide, historian and political scientist
  • Travel to Museum of Armed Struggle and Martyrology in Treblinka by bus
  • Never Again? The Legacy of the Holocaust guided by Tomasz Cebulski, PhD
  • Individual time 
  • Fellows’ Discussion, facilitated by Tomasz Cebulski, PhD
  • Travel to Warsaw by bus

June 5

Poland After 1945 and After 1989: Exploring the Notions of Freedom, Solidarity & Transformation
 
There are several aims to be achieved on this day. First of all, the fellows will be provided with time and space to reflect upon and to share thoughts on their visit to Treblinka in the context of the Holocaust and WWII. Second of all, referring to the recent anniversary of (regained) freedom, the day will be focused on the Polish Solidarity Movement, its leaders, values and methods of resistance. Why this social movement was so successful and influential not only for Poland but also for other parts of Europe? What are the universal lessons learned which are relevant nowadays and actions that could be critiqued especially from today’s perspective? Which good practices could be inspirational for other countries or which could be seen as troublesome (and why)? The second focus of this day concerns the system transformation after 1989 and the shaping of the so-called Third Polish Republic. This date marks the beginning of the ‘new’ Poland (or at least this is how it is being portrayed in a dominant national narrative)  and as such, it is the key point of reference when contextualizing the contemporary Poland’s successes and failures.  Finally, the last session will enable the fellows to understand how different generations of Poles differently look upon the legacy of Solidarity Movement and systemic transformation. The ambiguities related to the limits of freedom of speech and features of hate speech are the perfect point of departure for further discussion on condition of democracy in today’s Poland (Warsaw will serve as one of case studies). 
 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director
  • Let’s Take a Step Back: Fellows’ Discussion
  • S/solidarity & its Limits with Konstanty Gebert, writer and journalist 
  • 1989: the Beginning Poland’s Transformation with Professor Andrzej Rychard, Director of Institute of Philosophy and Sociology at Polish Academy of Sciences 
  • Systemic Transformation and its Impact from the Perspective of Young Generation with Artur Celiński, City Magazine
  • Fellows’ Discussion
  • Summary & Closing

June 6

Fellowship and Beyond
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President of the Managing Board of HIA Poland and Director
  • Action Project & Output Phase, part 1, HIA Poland staff
  • The Fellowship so Far: Sharing Impressions, HIA Poland staff
  • Free time and informal networking

June 7

Day off

June 8

Other ”Others” in the Polish Context: Cases of Roma, LGBTQ and Women
 
The Polish system transformation was an impetus for the democratic system to be (re)installed as well as for the  market economy to dominate on a macro level. At the same time, on a micro level of an average family it meant first of all a radical change: it was a new social order with new rules. As certain groups could not cope with new challenges, transformation also generated marginalization and exclusion and caused socio-economic divides within the society. The aim of the day is to explore the process of forging the new social order and its consequences on three case studies: LGBTQ, Roma, and women. The 3 cases will be introduced by representatives of 3 different non-governmental organizations, which will share their approaches towards and experiences with human rights violations (especially hate speech) and good practices in responding to them. A fact worth stressing is that some of the speakers are minority members themselves and therefore will also be able to present first-hand perspectives.
 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • Discrimination of Women: the Case of Poland with Agata Chełstowska, Institute of Public Affairs
  • Living in the Shadows? LGBTQ in Poland with Karolina Borowska, Lambda Warszawa and Michał Pawlęga, Lambda Warszawa, member of Amnesty International 
  • Living on the Margin? Roma in Poland with Joanna Talewicz-Kwiatkowska, PhD, Association of Roma in Poland
  • Fellows’ Discussion
  • Summary & Closing

June 9

Diversity, Hate Speech and the Case of Migrants
 
With reference to the previous day, the fellows will continue exploring the nuances of the Polish democracy and civic society esp. by focusing on challenges with the presence of migrants. After over 45 years of living in a communist/socialist ‘freezer’ with a very limited freedom of speech, Polish society is facing various difficulties that have been caused by a growing diversity. Opening borders after 1989 made Poles to question the prevalent notion of country’s homogeneity due to several factors such as: the influx of migrants into the country; (re)discovering diversity within the country exemplified by Poland-based national and ethnic minorities; and the possibility to freely travel and cross borders again. The fellows will explore what are the key challenges with integration and inclusion of newcomers as well as learn some good practices developed by selected NGOs. 
 
  • Welcome at Polin with Professor Dariusz Stola, Director, Museum of the History of Polish Jews Polin, HIA Poland Board Member
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • Monitoring and Reacting to Acts of Hate in Poland - Case Study: the Never Again Association with Jacek Purski, a Representative of the Never Again Association 
  • Migrants as Aliens? Challenges of Integration and Inclusion - Case Study: Association For Legal Intervention with Karolina Mazurczak, Association For Legal Intervention and Łukasz Niparko, 2014 Senior Fellow 
  • Social Change! Internet and Social Media with Alexey Sidorenko, Social Activist
  • Fellows’ Discussion
  • Summary & Closing

June 10

The Phenomenon of Hate Speech: Understanding It & Counteracting It
 
The overall goal of this day is to gain a more precise understanding of the phenomenon of hate speech in general. Throughout the day the fellows will try to find answers to the following questions: What counts as hate speech and what does not? What are the features of cyber-violence in general and in Poland particularly? In what ways official definitions are important in counteracting it? For example: How does the Council of Europe defines hate speech and hate crimes and to what purpose? What good practices in preventing hate speech developed by the Council to be shared or reshaped? What are the responses from the Polish civic society to acts of hate speech? Moreover, the day is also devoted to a search of good practices & hopefully some inspiration on how to respond to hate speech. We will specifically focus on how non-governmental organizations help preventing and counteracting hate speech on-line? 
 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • Newcomers in Poland: The Challenges of Every Day Life - Case Study: Polish Migration Forum Foundation with Agnieszka Kosowicz, Polish Migration Forum Foundation
  • Together Against the Hate Speech: Contribution of NGOs - Case Study: the “No Hate Speech” Coalition with Jan Dąbkowski, Representatives of the No Hate Speech Movement in Poland
  • Hate in Poland: How to Monitor it and Counteract it - Case Study: HejtStop with Miłosz Hodun, PhD, HejtStop
  • Going Viral! Social Campaigns from the Commercial Perspective with Marek Dorobisz, Strategic Copywriter and Creative Director, Founder of 36@
  • Fellows’ Discussion
  • Summary & Closing
Output Phase: Creative Action Time!

June 11

Training on Social Campaigns, part 1 

The day is devoted to the skills training with the aim to explore how to create and produce interesting memes and how to get other people to care about them (discuss, share, critique etc.). 

  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • Out of the Box Activism: Getting People to Care with Faith Bosworth, Peng! Collective Berlin
  • Summary & Closing
  • “Poland on the Move. Experts and Young Leaders on Multiculturalism Activists on Multiculturalism, Transformation, and Activism”, HIA Poland public event

June 12

Training on Social Campaigns, part 2

On this day the skills training will be in full speed. The fellows will start working on their own ideas and get some initial feedback. 

  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • Out of the Box Activism: Getting People to Care with Faith Bosworth, Peng! Collective Berlin
  • Summary & Closing

 

June 13 

  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • Joint Movie-Project, Introduction from Natasza Kotarska, FYPM
  • Graphic-design for Social Change with Mateusz Grabowski, Rochstar
  • Equality Parade
  • Joint Meeting with Judith Goldstein, PhD, HIA Founder and Executive Director and HIA Senior Fellows

June 14

Working in Groups

June 15

Movie-making Introductory Training 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • Short Introduction to Movie-making with Marcin Swystun (Martinez), OP1
  • Getting Creative! Group Work on Scenarios with Marcin Swystun (Martinez), OP1

June 16

Movie-making, Movie-screening, Feedback and Working on Improvements 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • First Presentations of Group Work & Feedback with Marcin Swystun (Martinez), OP1
  • Group Work on Movie-making

June 17

Time for Group Consultations (on request)
and/or
Continued Work on Visuals & Launching the Results On-line
 

June 18

Joint Movie Project
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director 
  • Brainstorming on a Joint Movie, optional
  • Summary & Announcements

June 19

Searching for Good Practices and Drafting Reports 
  • Introduction by Monika Mazur-Rafał, HIA Poland, President and Director
  • Presentations of Preliminary Group Work on Reports

June 20

Drafting Reports and Reflecting on Further Actions

The day will be devoted to individual and group work on reports, which should summarize their experiences gained during the output phase. Moreover, the fellows will be provided with a chance to continue their reflection on how their fellowship experience could be helpful/inspirational in developing their own projects counteracting hate speech on-line. The fellows are expected to show and share how their thinking on Action Projects after the fellowship has already progressed.

  • Introduction and Announcements
  • Action Projects: How to Link Output Phase with One’s Activism? Part 2
  • Fellows’ Discussion 

June 21

Day off or to work in Groups

June 22

The fellows are asked to work on their final presentation in the Pecha Kucha format, which will introduce the public into their work and findings/results. Each group will have ca. 7 minutes and once all 4 groups are done presenting there will be ca. 30 minutes for Q&A. Moreover, each  of the group members need to work collectively on their respective group reports.

  • Group Work on Presentations
  • Joint Lunch
  • Time for Group Consultations (on request)

June 23

Presenting Campaign Results

This day is meant as a celebration of the whole fellowship as well as show-time. The fellows should do their best to share their findings and ideas with others in an interesting and engaging manner. It will be also a time for collective brain-storming/feedback on how to make the already existing ideas more effective and interesting. 

  • Welcome & Introduction with HIA Poland staff
  • Hate Speech and Discrimination in Poland: the Perspective of Council of Europe (key note speech) with Professor Mirosław Wyrzykowski, University of Warsaw, Polish Expert at the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance
  • Presentations, Session 1 with Groups 1 to 4
  • Q&A
  • Presentations, Session 2 with Groups 5 to 8
  • Q&A
  • Summary & Closing

June 24

Official Closing of the Warsaw-based 2015 Fellowship 

The aim of the meeting is to share impressions after the whole experience, exchange some ideas for improvement of the program for the future as well as to fill in a feedback questionnaire. This is also the time when the certificates of participation will be handed in. Finally, the details regarding  the travel to International Conference will be discussed. 
  • Sharing Impressions & Closing Remarks  
  • Handing in Certificates of Participation

June 25

Group travel to the Sixth Annual International Confernece by plane

June 25-28

Sixth Annual Humanity in Action Conference in The Hague

June 28

Fellows travel back home

 

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