Program Schedule

Pictured: the 2016 John Lewis Fellows and Program Staff at the Center for Civil and Human Rights.

July 5

Check-In and Welcome Reception

Humanity in Action and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights welcome the third cohort of John Lewis Fellows to Atlanta, Georgia.  Fellows will arrive at Georgia State University Commons to check into their assigned suites, where they will have three hours to settle into their living spaces.  An evening welcome reception is planned at Paschal’s Restaurant and fellows will meet program staff, peers Humanity in Action Founder and Executive Director, Judith Goldstein. During dinner, each fellow and staff member will share a personal item that represents an aspect of their home country and their passion for human rights.   

9:00AM-2:00PM    Fellows arrive and check into Georgia State University Commons

2:00PM-7:00PM    Leisure Time 

7:00PM-9:00PM    Welcome Reception at Paschal’s Restaurant 

July 6

Introduction and Orientation 

The John Lewis Fellows will be formally welcomed to the program by Humanity in Action and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. The orientation will focus on the content of the fellowship program and rules and norms of engagement that will allow for the most productive experience for the fellows.  Fellows and staff will discuss the program schedule, educational process, community norms and rules, and the fellows’ end-of-program presentations.  The focus of this year’s program is on the New Appeal for Civil Rights, which was authored in 2017 by a coalition of student activists in consultation with civil rights veterans, Dr. Roslyn Pope, Charles Black and Lonnie King.  Each fellow will produce an oral and written expression of how her exposure to the City of Atlanta and what she has learned about its civil rights history and legacy has informed her perspective on one of the human rights demands expressed in the Appeal.

9:00AM-9:30AM    Greeting and Introduction to National Center for Civil and Human Rights 

  • Derreck Kayongo (Chief Executive Officer, National Center for Civil and Human Rights)
  • Professor Tanya Washington (Program Director, 2017 John Lewis Fellowship Program) 

9:30AM-10:30AM   Program Overview, Fellow Program Presentations, and Program Rules and Policies

  • Professor Tanya Washington (Program Director, 2017 John Lewis Fellowship Program)
  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program) 

10:30AM-10:45AM  Break

10:45PM-12:00PM   Community Building Exercise

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program) 

12:00PM-1:30PM   Lunch 

1:30PM-4:00PM    Fellows tour National Center for Civil and Human Rights Exhibition

4:00PM-5:00PM    Fellow Reflection Circle on National Civil and Human Rights tour

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)  
5:00PM-5:15PM    Daily Wrap-Up
  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)  

July 7

Awareness and Activism: Student and Ecclesiastic Engagement in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta

Fellows will learn about the mood of Atlanta’s black population in the 1960’s when Dr. Roslyn Pope and other student leaders decided to put their demands in writing.  Dr. Pope will describe the condition of Jim Crow and its impact on the individuals and communities who suffered its indignity and restrictions, and she will share what motivated her to catalogue and detail the violations at issue, to identify them as human rights infringements and to demand liberation from them.  Fellows will also learn about the role and contributions of the black clergy and church in the civil rights movement in Atlanta.

9:00AM-9:10AM   Morning Announcements 

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30PM  2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations 

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30PM-12:00PM   An Appeal for Human Rights   

  •  Dr. Roslyn Pope (Professor and Author of An Appeal for Human Rights, 1960)

12:00PM-1:30PM   Lunch

1:30PM-2:45PM   The Importance of History

  • Dr. Judith Goldstein (Founder and Executive Director, Humanity in Action)

2:45PM-3:00PM   Break  

3:00PM-4:30PM   The Black Church and Black Clergy in the Movement  

  •  Dr. Roslyn Pope (Professor and Author of An Appeal for Human Rights, 1960)

4:30PM-4:45PM   Break  

4:45PM-5:30PM   Fellows’ Reflection Circle

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)
5:30PM-5:45PM    Daily Wrap-Up
  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)  

July 8

Race, Place & Space in Atlanta: A Tour of the City and Its Civil Rights Legacy

Courtesy of Civil Rights Tours Atlanta, students will take a 3-hour tour of the city, narrated by Tom Houck, who was Dr. Martin Luther King’s former driver and aide.  This tour brings Atlanta’s legacy to life allowing fellows to experience the places, spaces and neighborhoods where heroes and sheroes of the movement made decisions that changed Atlanta and America.  The tour also allows fellows to reflect on how development and changing demographics in the city will affect the city’s legacy of inclusion and diversity

10:00AM    Meet at MLK Visitor Center  

11:00AM-2:00PM   Civil Rights Tour  (Fellows will be returned to MLK Visitor Center)

July 9

No programming.  

July 10

Fellows will learn how current civil and human rights realities are a reactionary consequence of white supremacy, traceable to before and after the dawn of America’s constitutional democracy.  This perspective will assist fellows’ understanding of contemporary obstacles to human and civil rights goals, racial equality, and inclusion within the broader framework of American history and will inform their understanding of how these obstacles can be overcome and/or circumvented.  Fellows will learn about reactions to human rights advocacy from stakeholders in the status quo and how those reactions create challenges to and opportunities for change.

9:00AM-9:10PM  Morning Announcements 

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10PM-9:30PM   2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations   

  •  Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30PM-12:00PM   White Rage:  The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation’s Racial Divide   

  •  Dr. Carole Anderson (Professor and Chair of the African American Studies Department, Emory University and Author of White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation’s Racial Divide) 

12:00PM-1:30PM   Lunch

1:30PM-3:20PM   Reactions to An Appeal for Human Rights

  • Dr. Roslyn Pope (Professor and Author of An Appeal for Human Rights, 1960)

3:20PM-3:35PM   Break  

3:35PM-4:45PM   Fellows’ Reflection Circle 

  •  Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

4:45PM-5:45PM   Fellows’ Country Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)
5:45PM-6:00PM    Daily Wrap-Up
  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)  

 

July 11

Historical Redux: A Question of Humanity 

Continuing with the theme of the resurgence of historical resistance to recognizing the full humanity of Black Americans, fellows will focus on how colonization informed the concept of race and created a racial hierarchy that dictated the diminished humanity of black people and others considered inferior.  Fellows will explore how the colonizer-settler framework continues to operate to frustrate efforts to eradicate human rights violations, and they will be challenged to imagine what human rights would look like if the hierarchy produced by colonization were eradicated.  Fellows will consider various strategies, tactics and expressions of agency, employed by blacks in the US to liberate and defend themselves, to assert their full humanity and to access the rights to which they are entitled under the US Constitution.  Fellows will also examine health in the context of human rights and how historical, racial discrimination and racialized deprivations have affected generations of Black Americans and continue to compromise the health of black individuals and communities

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30PM-10:15PM        Fellows’ Reflection Circle

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

10:15PM-10:30PM        Break

10:30PM-12:00PM        Race and Settler Colonialism in the United States Today 

  • Natsu Saito (Professor of Law and Distinguished University Professor, Georgia State University)

12:00PM-1:30PM        Lunch

1:45PM-3:00PM        Black Agency, Advocacy and Resistance  

  • Dr. Akinyele Umoja (Professor and Chair of the African American Studies Department, Georgia State University)

3:00PM-3:15PM        Break

3:15PM-4:30PM        Fellows Tour Law School Exhibit:  Health is a Human Right: Race and Place in America    

4:30PM-5:45PM        Fellows’ Country Presentations 

5:45PM-6:00PM        Daily Wrap-Up

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

July 12

A Curator’s Craft

Fellows will experience a full day of exposure to civil and human rights through the visual arts. Presenters will include museum curators and established and upcoming artists using their skills and talents to address contemporary manifestations of racism and racial discrimination and to celebrate the humanity, creativity and genius of black people and communities.  Presenters will address some of the obstacles that make their work so important and challenging.  Presentations will take place in the historic and outstanding Clark Atlanta University Art Gallery, which houses the collective works of some of the leading African-American visual artists of the twentieth century and contemporary works of some of the nation’s leading and emerging visual artists depicting the black experience. 

9:00AM-10:30AM    Museum Welcome 

  • Dr. Maurita Poole (Director of the Clark Atlanta University Art Gallery)

10:30AM-12:00PM    Fellows Tour Gallery 

12:00AM-1:30PM     Lunch at Clark Atlanta University Cafeteria  

1:30PM-3:00PM     Discussion with Dr. Poole About Gallery Experience 

3:00PM-3:15PM    Break

3:15PM-4:30PM    The Artist’s Way 

  • Tina Dunkley (Artist and Curator Emeritus of Clark Atlanta University Art Gallery)

4:30PM-5:30PM    Wine & Cheese Reception at Gallery 

July 13

Community, Development and Gentrification

Fellows will hear from former Mayor Shirley Franklin, the first female Mayor of Atlanta and the first black woman to serve as mayor of a major southern city, about her work as a public servant and public official and the importance of the National Center of Civil and Human Rights as a means of preserving and promoting Atlanta’s civic identity.  The fellows will be exposed to important lessons from the civil rights movement that should inform approaches to solving contemporary challenges facing black people and communities.  Fellows will also learn about the economic development planned for the city of Atlanta and the potential impact of these plans on communities of color in the contexts of housing and public health.  Fellows will be introduced to scholars who research urban development and renewal, community engagement and displacement, racialized housing and zoning policies and the causes and consequences of gentrification.  Fellows will be challenged to consider how to achieve a balance between strengthening and maintaining vulnerable communities of color and facilitating growth, inclusion and development in Atlanta as a whole

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30AM-11:00AM     Leadership and the Creation of a Center Committed to Civil and Human Rights  

  • Shirley Franklin (Barbara Jordan Visiting Professor of Ethics and Political Values, University of Texas  School of Public Policy and Former Mayor of the City of Atlanta 2002-2010)

11:00AM-11:15AM     Break 

11:15AM-12:00PM    Fellows’ Reflection Circle

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

12:00PM-1:30PM    Lunch

1:30PM-3:15PM    Behind the Movement: Lessons Learned

  • Richard Morton (Musician, performer, social worker, civil rights veteran)

3:15PM-5:00PM    Creating the Win-Win for Communities of Color and the City of Atlanta: Development Without Displacement

  • Professor Courtney Anderson (Associate Law Professor, Georgia State University)
  • Professor Erin Ruel (Associate Sociology Professor, Georgia State University)
  • Professor John Travis Marshall (Assistant Law Professor, Georgia State University)

5:00PM-5:15PM        Break

5:15PM-5:35PM        2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

5:35PM-5:50PM        Daily Wrap-UP

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

July 14

Housing As a Human Right: Preserving and Creating Affordability

Fellows will continue their exploration of the challenges inherent in reconciling aggressive economic development plans with meaningful inclusion and protection of vulnerable communities of color and the poor.  Fellows will learn about innovative efforts by city planners, architects, and organizations to address this challenge, within full view of the City’s historic, racialized realties.

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30AM-10:30AM   Preserving Atlanta’s Civic Identity and Culture as an Inclusive and Diverse Place 

  • Ryan Gravel (Urban thinker, designer, author, speaker and founder of Sixpitch)

10:30AM-10:45AM   Break

10:45AM-12:00PM   Creating Affordable Housing: Opportunities and Challenges

  • Dr. Stuart Romm (Professor of the Practice, Georgia Institute of Technology College of Architecture)

12:00PM-1:30PM       Lunch

1:45PM-4:15PM       The Transformative Power of Transit

  • The Transformation Alliance

4:30PM-5:30PM        Fellows’ Reflection Circle

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

5:30PM-5:45PM        Daily Wrap-UP

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

July 15

A Spoken Word Experience

Fellows will attend Under My Hood Truth Experience, a spoken word presentation at the National Center for Human Rights.  The event will provide fellows with an opportunity to experience artistic expression devoted to the diminished humanity of black people and black males in particular in contemporary society and to the illusory nature of the identities in which we cloak ourselves

6:00PM-9:00PM       Under My Hood Truth Experience

  • Coleman G. Howard (Author, yoga practitioner, speaker and poet)

July 16

The King Church

Fellows will visit the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church for an 11:30 worship service.  Ebenezer describes itself as an urban-based, global ministry dedicated to individual growth and social transformation.

11:30AM-1:00PM    Ebeneezer Service

July 17

In Black and Blue: Criminal (In)Justice 

Fellows will focus on how structural and institutional racism impact individuals and communities in the criminal justice context.  Fellows will hear about a range of reform efforts targeting laws, policies, and practices that make individuals of color and communities of color vulnerable to racialized policing, police brutality and mass incarceration.  Fellows will be introduced to activists, lawyers, advocates, and organizations working to protect the rights of black people and communities of color and for the recognition of their full humanity.  Fellows will also explore the value of and reactions to youth activism in contemporary social and political movements and consider whether and how contemporary challenges around racialized policing are similar to historical relations among the police and black people and communities.

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30AM-11:45AM   Organizational Responses to Criminal Justice Reform  

  • Attorney Doug Ammar (Executive Director, Georgia Justice Project)
  • Professor Lauren Sudeall Lucas (Founding Director Center for Access to Justice)
  • Sara Totonchi (Executive Director, Southern Center for Human Rights)

12:00PM-1:30PM   Lunch

1:45PM-3:45PM   Using the Master’s Tools to Dismantle the Master’s House: The Utility of Law to Achieve Criminal Justice Reform 

  • Attorney Mawuli Davis (Founder and Partner, Davis Bozeman Law Firm)
  • Attorney Gary Spencer (Founder, R. Gary Spencer, P.C.)
  • Attorney Tiffany Williams Roberts (Managing Attorney, The Roberts Law Firm) 

4:00PM-5:45PM       Fellows will view the movie 13th by Ava Duvernay 

6:00PM-6:15PM        Daily Wrap-UP

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

July 18

An Exploration of Restoration

Fellows will learn about restorative justice as a framework, approach and tool for achieving ends centered on rehabilitating and empowering victims of racial discrimination, oppression and violence. Fellows will also learn about the history of the racialized and oppressive treatment of Native Americans by the federal government and the state of Georgia and explore how historical facts have been distorted to mask this mistreatment. Fellows will consider the use of a restorative justice approach in Atlanta 2017 to address contemporary challenges that infringe on citizens’ human rights, as expressed in the New Appeal for Human Rights. This approach could inform efforts to address Atlanta’s contemporary challenges over the next several years.

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30AM-12:00PM    Restorative Justice: A Means of and An End to Achieving Empowerment 

  • Professor David Hooker (Professor of the Practice of Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame)

12:00PM-1:30PM   Lunch

1:30PM-2:30PM       Fellows will view the movie The Canary Effect by Robin Davey and Yellow Thunder Woman

2:30PM-2:45PM       Break

2:45PM-4:00PM       Fellows’ Reflection Circle

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

4:00PM-4:15PM       Break

4:15PM-5:00PM       Fellows’ Personal Presentations (4) 

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

6:00PM-7:00PM       Daily Wrap-Up

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

July 19

Museum Exhibits Shaping Perspectives 

Fellows will visit the historic Herndon Home Museum, a historic house and National Historic Landmark, which reflects Atlanta’s distinctive development as a center for Black business, education, and culture.   From Alonzo Herndon’s rise from slavery to leadership in the Black business community, the history of the Herndons provides a unique resource of local and national significance in the interpretation of Black struggle and achievement.  Fellows will also visit the Atlanta History Center, where they will tour 3 exhibits: Gatheround: Stories of Atlanta; Shaping Traditions: Folk Art in a Changing South; and Native Lands: Indians and Georgia.  Viewing these exhibitions will allow fellows to consider how museum exhibits shape public perception and perspectives on the history of racial discrimination and existing racialized realities. Fellows will also have the opportunity to hear and learn from Native American scholar and prolific author, Ward Churchill, about contemporary challenges facing Native Americans and their communities. 

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

10:15AM-11:30AM  Fellows will tour Herndon Home Museum 

11:30AM-1:00PM      Lunch

1:00PM-3:30PM      Fellows will tour Gatheround: Stories of Atlanta; Shaping Traditions: Folk Art in a Changing South; and Native Lands: Indians and Georgia at the Atlanta History Center

3:30PM-6:00PM    Break

6:00PM-8:00PM    Lecture and Book Signing of Wielding Words Like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, National Center for Civil and Human Rights

  • Professor Ward Churchill (Author, speaker and activist)

July 20

Coalitions Of Intersecting Identities 

Fellows will focus on organizations and groups organized around a human rights agenda that serves multiple and diverse constituencies and the challenges and opportunities that these coalitions present. Fellows will consider how the current political climate has inspired more of these coalitions.   Fellows will hear from Attorney Andrea Young, Andrew Young’s daughter, who currently heads the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia and whose career has centered on promoting policies to defend and extend civil and human rights.  Fellows will also meet and speak with youth activists and students who authored the New Appeal for Human Rights and with civil rights veterans, who helped with the New Appeal.  The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum will provide an outstanding setting for an inter-generational discussion about priorities, strategies and approaches to addressing contemporary human rights violations.

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30AM-10:45AM    Continued Relevance of the ACLU as a Bulwark Against Human and Civil Rights Violations

  • Attorney Andrea Young (Author and Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia)

10:45AM-11:00AM   Break

11:00AM-12:30PM   Lunch and movie Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin 

2:00PM-4:00PM      A New Appeal for Civil and Human Rights at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library 

  • Emiko Soltis (Student Author of New Appeal, Activist, Organizer)
  • Asma Elhuni (Student Author of New Appeal, Activist, Organizer)
  • Dr. Roslyn Pope (Professor and Author of An Appeal for Human Rights, 1960)
  • Charles Black (Civil Rights Veteran, Organizer and Activist)
  • Lonnie King (Civil Rights Veteran, Organizer and Activist)

July 21

Towards A More Inclusive Human Rights Agenda

Fellows will examine the role of discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation as an integral aspect of the modern human rights movement.  Fellows will discuss the role that LGBTQ+ people and communities played in the civil rights movement in Atlanta and how and why their presence and contributions have been concealed and/or “sequestered.”  Fellows will learn about Georgia Equality and the work of its membership targeting laws, policies and practices that discriminate against members of the LGTBQ+ community

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30AM- 10:45AM  Georgia Equality

  • Jeff Graham (Executive Director, Georgia Equality)
  • Dr. Matthew Robison (Board Member, Georgia Equality)

12:30PM-2:30PM      Georgia Stand Up Community Meeting at IBEW Building

 

 

3:00PM-4:30PM     Fellows’ Reflection Circle

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

4:45PM-5:00PM      Daily Wrap-Up

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

July 22

No programming.

July 23

No programming.

July 24

History and Symbolism: A Visit to Stone Mountain

Fellows will spend the day touring Stone Mountain, which Dr. Martin Luther King referenced in his legendary “I Have a Dream” speech, as an example of an environment marked by racial discrimination.  The experience will allow fellows to consider the current controversy surrounding the presence of statutes commemorating civil war heroes, who supported slavery and racial discrimination.  Fellows will visit the Confederate Hall Historical and Environmental Education Center and take a skyride to the top of Stone Mountain for an up-close look at the Confederate Memorial Carving of President Jefferson Davis and Confederate Generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson.  Fellows will discuss proposals to include a monument to Dr. Martin Luther King at the park. 

10:00AM   Meet at Georgia State College of Law 85 Park Place NE / Atlanta, GA 30315

10:00AM-4:00PM    Fellows will tour Stone Mountain and select exhibits

6:00PM-8:00PM   A Trek to the River’s Edge: Movie Showing and Discussion at National Center for Civil and Human Rights  

  • Althea Brown (Director and Producer, A Trek to the River’s Edge)

July 25

Race, Religion and Citizenship: Immigration and Inclusion

Fellows will consider the large-scale contemporary immigration crisis in full view of state and national policies targeting vulnerable Latino people and communities and profiling Muslims and refugees seeking admission into the US and into the state of Georgia.  The issue of sanctuary cities and schools is expressed as a moral and human rights imperative in the New Appeal for Human Rights, and the fellows will learn about and discuss the challenges faced by immigrants of various races and religious faiths in this city coined “The City too Busy to Hate.”  

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-10:00AM    4 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

10:00AM-10:45AM    Films:  Immigration in America 2017 & Muslim in America 2017

10:45AM-11:00AM   Break

11:00AM-12:00PM   Inside the Immigration Crisis for Latinos in Atlanta 

  • Dr. Samuel T. Livingston (Professor, Chair, African American Studies, Morehouse College)

12:00PM-1:30PM    Lunch

1:30PM-3:00PM     Religious Freedom and Restrictions for Muslim Communities

  • Ahmed Mitchell (President, CAIR Georgia)

3:00PM-3:15PM     Break

3:15PM-4:30PM     Fellows’ Reflection Circle

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

4:30PM-4:45PM      Break

4:45PM-5:00PM      Daily Wrap-Up

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

July 26

Children in the Movement

In 1963, more than a dozen African American girls, aged 13-15, were held in a stockade for two months for demonstrating for integration in Americus, Georgia.  Their parents did not know where their missing girls were for more than two weeks.  When the parents’ discovered their whereabouts the only thing they could do was slip food to them through the bars of the window in the room where the girls were held.  The girls were released, without ever having been charged, and the parents were charged a $2 boarding fee.  Fellows will meet one of those girls, Dr. Shirley Reese, and hear her account of this horrific experience and how it inspired her career in civil and human rights.  Fellows will visit and tour the stockade where the girls were held and have lunch in Leesburg.

9:00AM-9:10AM    Morning Announcements  

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:10AM-9:30AM    2 Fellows Provide Individual Presentations

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

9:30AM-6:00PM  Fellows will leave for Stockade in Leesburg, Georgia 

5:45PM-6:00PM     Daily Wrap-Up (On Bus)

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Associate Director, John Lewis Fellowship Program)

July 27

Fellows' Action Projects

Fellows’ presentations will be written and artistic expressions focused on the demand in the New Appeal for Human Rights that most appeals to them and proposing a restorative justice approach to addressing the issue at the heart of the selected demand.

9:00AM-5:00PM   Fellows' Presentations

July 28

Fellows' Action Projects

Fellows’ presentations will be written and artistic expressions focused on the demand in the New Appeal for Human Rights that most appeals to them and proposing a restorative justice approach to addressing the issue at the heart of the selected demand.

9:00AM-4:00PM     Fellows' Presentation

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

July 29

Closing of the Program

In the closing event for the fellowship program, fellows will experience a theatrical performance, centered on the life and work of Congressman John Lewis.  Having spent a month learning about and being exposed to the civil rights legacy that is the defining feature of Atlanta, fellows will enjoy a production that celebrates the courage and contributions of this American hero, after which this fellowship program is named. 

2:00PM-4:00PM      Collision Project Through the Alliance Theatre: Performance of John Lewis’ “The March”

  • Pearl Cleage (Renowned author, playwright, and Playwright in Residence, Alliance Theatre)

4:00PM-5:00PM       Reception

July 30

Closing of the Program

On the final day of programming in the fellowship, fellows break bread with Congressman John Lewis and program speakers and presenters at a farewell brunch held in honor of the program’s namesake and to celebrate the John Lewis Fellows’ exploration of civil and human rights during their time in Atlanta

10:00AM-1:00PM      Farewell Brunch Honoring Congressman John Lewis