Workshop Schedule

KEYNOTE, The Internet Movement for Women’s Rights in Iran
Dr. Massoumeh Torfeh has looked at Iranian women and how they have used social media since 2000. She will give a presentation of her studies and raise a number of important questions. With Q & A’s from the floor.

Facilitator: Representative from KVINFO

A Non-Violent Approach
Mai (SUDAN) & Erica Chenoweth Why is non-violence important? What can be achieved by a non-violent approach? What kind of tools can be used in a struggle and how do you use them? Erica Chenoweth will be explaining how non-violence can be used as a powerful tool in the struggle for democracy from an academic background, and raise relevant questions about the use of non-violence. Mai Ali will tell about the ongoing struggle in Sudan and how they use non-violence in a country where civil war has been waged for more than 25 years.

Facilitator: Rasmus S. Søndergaard, Senior Fellow in Humanity in Action. Student of History at the University of Copenhagen with a specialisation in US foreign relations. He works as a student assistant at the Centre for Advanced Security Studies at Copenhagen University. 

The Importance of Youth Empowerment
Srdja (Serbia) & Kudakwashe (Zimbabwe) In several counties, the youth is reacting on the lack of opportunities and economic problems like unemployment and difficulties in the possibility for education, demonstration advocacy and so on. Why are young people so important in the struggle for democracy? It appears as if the youth has often played a crucial part in gathering the initiative for change; how come the burden of motivation has to rest on the youth and not on the more experienced? How may the potential of the youth be put to use in a reasonable way? How can we make sure that the voices of the youth are heard? How can young people get access to information? Is there a significant symbolic value in the fact that young people act to change the future of their country? Kudakwashe Chakabva from ZINASU (Zimbabwe National Student Union) and Srdja from CANVAS, Serbia will get together for a highly relevant and well-informed discussion.

Facilitator: Ulla Gade Bisgaard has worked for UNICEF and various other organizations, among them the National Institute of Human Rights. From 2007-2010, she was Director of Humanity in Action Denmark. She is currently employed as an administrator at the Danish Institute for Parties and Democracy.

Social Media - a Helpful Tool in the Struggle for Democracy?
Rima (Syria) & Yahia (Egypt) Revolutions gathered new attention in 2011 with the uprisings that occurred in MENA. But why is it happening now and does social media play a role? Is there a limit to the spreading of democracy and is it connected to social media? How do you use social media without being exposed by the powers you are struggling with? Rima will tell her experiences as a journalist writing about the Syrian National Council and the new Syrian media outlets. Yahia from Egypt will tell his story of how social media played a part in the events that unfolded in Egypt, and why they how they think social media is helping in the struggle for democracy.

Facilitator: Petter Åttingsberg, Programme Manager, Online and Social Media at IMS

The Role of External Partners?
Judith (Zimbabwe) & Slobodan (Serbia) An increasing number of organizations succeed in reaching a major part of the public with their agenda - in some cases even on a global scale. How do you engage people in other countries and parts of the world in the attempt to bring about a revolution? How do you work with support across borders in order to improve the chances of an international partnership and what role should external partners play? Slobodan from Serbia and Judith from Zimbabwe will have a discussion on how aid can help in the struggle for democracy and how to handle demands from external partners without compromising the vision for the working organization.

Facilitator: Representative from Ibis. (TBA)

The Role of the Youth Striving for Lasting Democracy
Mikita (Belarus), Rodrigo (Venezuela) & Sebit (South Sudan) As we have recently witnessed, young people have been front figures in many of the demonstrations that have taken place. How can the young generation maintain the vision for a democratic state when things turn violent, nothing change and their struggle is not heard? What role will/does/should the youth play when the revolution is over and how can the youth make way for a democracy that will last? Mikita will share his view on the situation in Belarus and on whether or not the youth can make a difference in the country, and how he is working towards this goal through the organization ”Revolution though Social Network”, where he is a coordinator. Rodrigo from Venezuela will tell why he founded the foundation Futuro Presente (Future Presents). Sebit will explain how a student organization help in the elections for the state of South Sudan, and how young people are now working for the future of the country.

Facilitator: Susanne Branner Jespersen Lector at Africa studies and has worked with young people in non-violence MENA.

A Non-Violent Approach SPEECH
Srdja Popovic & Erica Chenoweth Why is non-violence important? What can be achieved by a non-violent approach? What kind of tools can be used in a struggle and how do you use them? Srdja from CANVAS (Center for Applied Non-Violent Action & Strategies) will be telling OTPOR!s story from Serbia and how they used non-violence to pave the way for freedom. He will be teaching about tools in non-violence and raise relevant questions about the non-violent approach. He and Erica will be answering questions from the floor.

Facilitator: Rasmus S. Søndergaard, Senior Fellow in Humanity in Action. Student of History at the University of Copenhagen with a specialisation in US foreign relations. He works as a student assistant at the Centre for Advanced Security Studies at Copenhagen University.

Social Media - a Helpful Tool in the Struggle for Democracy?
Kudawashe (Zimbabwe) & Rodrigo (Venezuela) Revolutions gathered new attention in 2011 with the uprisings that occurred in MENA. But why is it happening now and does social media play a role? Is there a limit to the spreading of democracy and is it connected to social media? How do you use social media without being exposed by the powers you are struggling with? Kudakwashe will tell about how they in ZINASU (Zimbabwe National Student Union) use social media in their work and Rodrigo from Venezuela will tell about the organization “generation wave” that use social media but in a very special way so that their info not get in the wrong hands. And Rodrigo will tell about "Un Mundo Sin Mordaza - A World Without Censorship" in Venezuela where he is president.

Facilitator: Petter Åttingsberg, Programme Manager, Online and Social Media at IMS (International Media Support)

The Importance of Youth Empowerment
Slobodan (Serbia) & Sebit (South Sudan)  In several counties, the youth is reacting on the lack of opportunities and economic problems like unemployment and difficulties in the possibility for education, demonstration advocacy and so on. Why are young people so important in the struggle for democracy? It appears as if the youth has often played a crucial part in gathering the initiative for change; how come the burden of motivation has to rest on the youth and not on the more experienced? How may the potential of the youth be put to use in a reasonable way? How can we make sure that the voices of the youth are heard? How can young people get access to information? Is there a significant symbolic value in the fact that young people act to change the future of their country? Sebit from Institute for the Development of Civil Society (in South Sudan) and Slobodan from CANVAS, Serbia will get together for a highly relevant and well-informed discussion.

Facilitator: Ulla Gade Bisgaard has worked for UNICEF and various other organizations, among them the National Institute of Human Rights. From 2007-2010, she was Director of Humanity in Action Denmark. She is currently employed as an administrator at the Danish Institute for Parties and Democracy.

The Role of the Youth Striving for Lasting Democracy
Mai (Sudan) & Yahia (Egypt) As we have recently witnessed, young people have been front figures in many of the demonstrations that have taken place. How can the young generation maintain the vision for a democratic state when things turn violent, nothing change and their struggle is not heard? What role will/does/should the youth play when the revolution is over and how can the youth make way for a democracy that will last? Mai Ali will share her ideas about the future of Sudan and why she travels around the country training young people in democracy. Also, she will touch on the issue of how to keep focus on the possibilities for a new country that still have a lot of problems but want to focus on the positive story. Yahia will share his view on the future of Egypt by explaining what has been done, what will happen and how the youth is an active part of the new Egypt.

Facilitator: Susanne Branner Jespersen, Lector at Africa studies and has worked with young people in non-violence.

Revolutionary in Exile
Rima (Syria) & Mikita (Belarus)  A number of people around the world are engaged in the struggle for human rights and democracy but have to struggle from the outside, as they are exiled from their home country. We see this in the situation of Burma, where underground politics are being conducted from Thailand; a similar example is from Belarus, where people are working from Poland, Ukraine and Lithuania, and recently, we have seen exile activists from Syria working from primarily from Turkey and Lebanon. In what way is the struggle for democracy influenced when you are living in exile, does it create a global network among people from the same nation and does it create a more nationalistic community being abroad? Rima from Syria, who lives in exile in Lebanon, and Mikita from Belarus will be discussing the working conditions of people living in exile and how they contribute to the progress of their home country.

Facilitator: Ina Holmgaard, Activist Coordinator at Amnesty International (TBA)

Women in Cyber Activism
Dr. Massoumeh Torfeh & Judith Women are a relatively new group in cyber activism. Especially during the Arabic spring, more female bloggers emerged; blogs have gradually come to be seen as a place in which to express revolutionary ideas. Why is it necessary for women to have a special place on the internet to blog? Is freedom of speech something that is being reached in a new way by women online, and how does the physical world collaborate with life in cyberspace? Dr. Massoumeh Torfeh has looked at Iranian women and how they have used social media since 2000. She will give a short presentation of her studies and raise a number of important questions with Judith who is training woman in Zimbabwe in human right and is using social media in her work as a way for women to communicate.

Facilitator: Representative from KVINFO (TBA)