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John Lewis Fellows Reflective Essays 2016

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In 2016, Humanity in Action published a collection of reflections written by the 2016 John Lewis Fellows. In the essays, the Fellows write about their experiences in the John Lewis program, delving into personal aspects of their own identities – such as national, ethnic, gender, racial or religious – and reveal ways in which participation in the program has shaped their personal outlooks and perspectives on democracy and diversity. In the essays, the John Lewis Fellows also provide intellectual and personal responses – reactions and aspirations – in regard to the subjects and speakers presented throughout the program.

These essays focus on the exploration of Atlanta’s history and contemporary social justice issues prevalent in pluralistic societies. These compositions were a requisite component for completion of the 2016 John Lewis Fellowship.

To read, click on each of the essays below or download the booklet here.


Table of Contents

Introduction
Judith Goldstein, Founder and Executive Director of Humanity in Action

The Fire This Time
Ryan Wilson

Black Feminism in the Context of German Society – Reflections on Active Engagement for Change
Sarah Robinson

It’s Easier to be White in America. How Can We Fix It?
Ashley Needham

“History Repeats Itself” & “Bring Your Knowledge Back to your Community” – How Small Statements Have Large Implications
Laure Assayag

A Call to Relearn the Historical Struggle for Black Liberation and to Imagine a Liberated Future: What We Can Learn from the Success and Failures of our Ancestors
Cassandra Chislom

Learning, Unlearning and Being a White Ally
Malgorzata Sobolewska

“We Will Not Be Used”: On History, Accountability, and Liberatory Solidarity
Samantha Keng

John Lewis Fellowship 2016 | Final Essay
Eric Otieno

“History is Not Hatred”: The Power of History to Ignite Social Activism
Reyna Araibin

A Call for Accountability: A New Vision for a Liberated Future
River Bunkley

“Drive the Right Car” Critically Examining Allyship and Organization
Christine Yu

Transformational Read-in(g)s. Reading as a Form of Activism
Malgorzata Leszko

Exclusion politics: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brexit case study and USA
Ana Jovanović

Reflection Essay
Kassandra Valles

The Role of ‘Privileged’ Allies in the Struggle for Social Justice
Angeliki-Fanouria Giannaki

Reflection Essay
Karissa Tom

Reflection Letter
Jacob Rudolph

The Quest for Good Trouble: Education and Empowerment
Ahva Sadeghi

Finding Your Voice in a World of Silent Majorities
Asia Ali

A Letter for Those Who Need Stories and Black Magic
Symone Purcell

Lessons from the Civil Rights Movement: Reflections on the Long Movement for Black Liberation from Atlanta to Amsterdam
Mitchell Esajas

Coalition Building: Foregoing the Idyllic Common Good
Kathy Fernandez

Ready for Battle
Berna Keskindemir

Reflection Essay
Joseph Samuel Quisol

Successful Social Movements – A Blueprint
Madeeha Mehmood

Self-fulfilling Prophecy and Stereotypes
Nedima Dzaferagic

Transformations
Nelly Niloufar Gordpour