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The John Lewis Fellowship

The Humanity in Action journey begins with a year-long Fellowship

Placing Atlanta’s human rights realities today into the context of the Civil Rights Movement and current grassroots solidarities

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Balancing Arts Ent. LLC, John Lewis at the Center for Civil and Human Rights, 2015

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Unique in its long commitment to slavery, “The South” has a distinctive role in the making of America. The region also has a richly-layered cultural landscape and is home to vibrant traditions of organized resistance and progressive politics. For all its exceptionalism, the complexities of race, class, culture, and conflict in the American South reflect the very soul of US society. Atlanta, an important Southern battleground of the modern American Civil Rights Movement, is an especially poignant site for contemplating America’s troubled racial past, and importantly, for setting the course toward a redemptive future.

The John Lewis Fellowship in Atlanta, in partnership with the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, looks at the regional experiences, cultures, and institutions of the American South through a different thematic lens every year. The 2019 Fellowship illuminates strategies of allyship and unified action for advancing social equity and racial justice. Fellows will leave Atlanta better equipped to examine structural oppression and internalized prejudice from different standpoints—and to bring lessons of leadership and coalition-building into their own future professional and activist work.

After the month in Atlanta, our Fellows develop impactful Action Projects in their own communities.

For the eleven months following their time in Atlanta, Fellows work on their Action Project: an independent venture focused on promoting democratic values in their own communities. Action Projects are as diverse as Humanity in Action Fellows. Fellows apply their new knowledge and perspectives to the communities they impact—in whatever format they find meaningful. Past Action projects have been documentaries, arts festivals, and new organizations that serve a public good. Planning for the Action Project begins during the study portion of the Fellowship, through workshops and collaborative discussion.

John Lewis Fellows Read "An Appeal For Human Rights"

  • An Appeal for Human Rights

    Our 2016 John Lewis Fellowship read Roslyn Pope’s “An Appeal for Human Rights,” initially published on March 9, 1960.

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Fellowship Partners and Sponsors

We thank our supporters and partners, Senior Fellows and friends of Humanity in Action. These contributions help to prepare outstanding students for a lifelong commitment to civic responsibility and the promotion of human rights.