John Lewis Fellowship Program in Atlanta

Program Description

After two successful years examining diversity and civil rights in America through the lens of the American South, in its third year the John Lewis Fellowship is expanding its thematic focus to restorative justice in Atlanta, Georgia. In partnership with the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, Humanity in Action intends to refocus the Atlanta program around the way one city is dealing with histories of division, discrimination and racism. As such, Fellows will explore what restorative justice would mean in Atlanta in the coming years; how to build a community that encourages knowledge of and responsibility for past injustices and looks toward greater unity through both a common understanding of the past and rectifications in the future. 

The four-week inquiry and resulting blueprint for restorative justice will involve a multidisciplinary approach. Fellows, speakers and staff will produce a blueprint – "An Appeal for Human Rights and Restorative Justice" for the city. Fellows will look at this concept from many different perspectives as the issues infuse both public life and individual attitudes and responsibilities: education, health, the law, residential patterns, police practices, urban planning, local and state government, religious institutions, the arts and restoration of historic sites and areas. Consequently, the program will draw upon informed and inspiring academics from many disciplines as well as those in journalism, urban affairs, religion, government, public health, the law and NGOs.

The goal of Humanity in Action and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights is to create a program for emerging leaders to learn, engage in intellectual discourse, propose solutions and develop the skill-sets needed to bring forth effective social, political and economic changes that improves the lives within and beyond the United States. In the past two years, the curriculum of the John Lewis program focused on the history and global impact of the Civil Rights Movement, immigration reform and Native American issues. Fellows participated in discussions with renowned scholars, activists and political leaders who have dedicated themselves to advancing civil and human rights in the United States and beyond. In 2016, Fellows also produced a collection of reflections about their experiences in the John Lewis program, delving into personal aspects of their own identities – such as national, ethnic, gender, racial, or religious – and ways in which participation in the program has shaped their personal outlooks and perspectives on democracy and diversity. 

2016 Agenda

July 5

Move-In and Opening Reception

Humanity in Action and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights welcome the second cohort of the John Lewis Fellowship Program taking place in Atlanta, Georgia. Fellows will arrive at Georgia State University Commons to check into assigned suites. Fellows are allotted a three-hour block of time to settle into their living spaces. Fellows will participate in an evening reception where they are introduced to Humanity in Action Founder and Executive Director, Judith Goldstein, program staff and peers. During dinner, each Fellow and staff member will share a personal item that embodies a personal narrative about their life, one’s home country, and their concern for human rights.  

9:00AM-2:00PM    Fellows Check into Georgia State University Commons 

2:00PM-5:00PM    Leisure Time 

6:30PM-8:30PM    Opening Reception at Mary Mac’s Tea Room 

July 6

Welcome and Orientation 

The John Lewis Fellows will be welcomed by Humanity in Action and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. Fellows will participate in an orientation that will introduce them to the city and the contours and the interactive nature of the program. Fellows and staff will discuss the program schedule, educational process, community building, and presentations. At the end of the program all Fellows will be asked to make oral and written presentations in which they will share new perspectives on the issues that will be explored throughout the program. 

9:00AM-9:20AM    Opening Greetings

  • Derreck Kayongo (Chief Executive Officer, National Center forCivil and Human Rights)
  • Deborah Richardson (Executive Vice President,National Center for Civil and Human Rights),
  • Andre D. Dickens (Atlanta City Council Member, Post 3 at Large, Board of Trustees, National Center for Civil and Human Rights)
  • Karcheik Sims-Alvarado PhD (Program Director,John Lewis Fellowship)

 

9:20AM-10:00AM   American Exceptionalism


  • Judith S. Goldstein PhD (Founder and Executive Director, Humanity in Action) 

10:15AM-11:45AM  Viewing the NCCHR “Civil Rights” Exhibition Part I

1:15PM-2:00PM   Community Building Workshop Part I

  • Ufuk Kâhya  (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship) 

2:00PM-2:30PM   Sexual Harassment

  • Michelle Issadore (Vice President, Operations and Public Information, the NCHREM Group, Inc.) 

2:45PM-4:00PM    Viewing the NCCHR Exhibition “Human Rights” Exhibition Part II

4:00PM-5:00PM    Community Building Workshop Part II

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)  

July 7

“Sankofa”: Reaching Back to Move Forward

Presenters will offer a historical overview of African-Americans’ quest for personal, political, and economic autonomy throughout the long Black Freedom Struggle in America.  Speakers will focus on the enslavement of African Americans as a global human rights violation. The day will commence with a discussion of the Middle Passage in which Africans were brought to America as part of the global slave trade. The discussion will be followed by an examination of Modern Civil Rights Movement during the mid-twentieth century.

9:00AM-11:00AM   The Coming 

  • Dr. Daniel Black (Full Professor of African American Studies, Clark AtlantaUniversity, Novelist)

11:00AM-12:00PM  The Quest for Freedom: From the American Revolution-Post Reconstruction 

  • Karcheik Sims-Alvarado, PhD (Program Director, John Lewis Fellowship)

2:00PM-3:00PM“   What are Civil and Human Rights?” Discussion and Exercise 

  •  La’Neice Littleton (Program Assistant, John Lewis Fellowship)

3:00PM-5:00PM   “An Appeal for Human Rights”

  • Dr. Roslyn Pope (Author of the manifesto, “An Appeal For Human Rights”, 1960)

July 8

Slavery and Lynching in America 

Fellows will have the opportunity to engage the system of chattel slavery and modern day human trafficking via a presentation on the life of Abolitionist Frederick Douglass, by Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. author of Picturing Frederick Douglass, and founder and president of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives. The succeeding discussion, with Dr. James Thomas, will cover racial terrorism during the Jim Crow era along with the psychology of racism in America both past and present. 

9:00AM-10:00AM    Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship) 

10:00AM-12:00PM   The Life of Frederick Douglass, Abolitionist

  • Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. (Founder and President, Frederick Douglass Family Initiative)

2:00PM-3:30PM      Lynching and the Psychology of Racism in America

  • Dr. James Thomas (Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Mississippi) 

6:00PM-8:00PM      Evening Program and Book Signing with Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. 

July 9

Touring Sweet Auburn Avenue, The Black Mecca of the South

Fellows will have the opportunity to learn about the financial, religious, and civic organizations on Auburn Avenue that supported the long Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta from 1865-1965. Fellows will have an opportunity to visit the historic sites of Ebenezer Baptist Church, the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, the original locations of SCLC, the NAACP, SNCC, and other Civil Rights organizations.  

9:30AM-12:00PM     Sweet Auburn Avenue Tour

  • Nasir Muhammad (CEO and Founder of Black Meccaof the South Tours)

July 10

Meet and Greet with Nelson Mandela Fellows 

Fellows will have the opportunity to meet and greet with the Nelson Mandela Fellows from South Africa and participate in the Eid celebration hosted by the Andrew Young School of Public Policy at Georgia State University. (Food and refreshments will be provided. Swimwear is encouraged.) 

11:00AM-2:00PM      Eid Celebration with Nelson Mandela Fellows 

July 11

Atlanta’s “Race Men and Women” of the Twentieth Century 

In the morning, Fellows will visit the home of Alonzo Herndon, slave-born founder of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company. Through the life of Herndon, Fellows will also learn about W. E. B. Du Bois, George Towns and Norris Herndon, founders of the Niagara Movement (precursor to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). In their opposition toward the political ideology of Booker T. Washington, Atlanta’s black intelligentsia organized in an effort to progressively push for inclusion within the public sphere, suffrage rights, equal education and the right to purchase land. After the tour, Fellows will engage in a conversation with Dr. Jacqueline Rouse about early twentieth-century “Race Women” and their active leadership roles during the long Civil Rights Movement. In the afternoon, Fellows will visit the sites where W. E. B. Du Bois resided and wrote his seminal work, Souls of Black Folk, founded The Crisis and Phylon and experienced the horror of the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot, followed by presentations about his life and legacy. 

9:00AM-10:00AM      Herndon Home Tour

10:00AM-11:00AM    Women of the Modern Civil Rights Movement 

  • Dr. Jacqueline Rouse (Associate Professor, History, Georgia State University) 

1:00PM-2:15PM        Organizational Structure of the Modern Civil Rights Movement

  • Dr. Charmayne Patterson (Assistant Professor, History, Clark AtlantaUniversity)

2:30PM-3:45PM        The Legacy of W. E. B. Du Bois 

  • Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans (Professor, Char, African American Studies, Africana Women’s Studies, and History, Clark Atlanta University)

3:45PM-5:00PM        The House that Du Bois Built 

  • Dr. Kurt Young (Professor, Chair, Political Science, Clark Atlanta University) 

July 12

A Discussion on Race, Education, and Civil and Human Rights 

In the morning, Fellows will engage with Dr. Beverly Tatum about the nature of race and education in America. Dr. Carol Anderson will continue the conversation with a discussion about defining civil and human rights. In the afternoon, Fellows will be allotted time to work on their end-of-program presentations. During the evening, Fellows will attend a stage production of Trey Anthony’s "‘Da Kink in my Hair" at the Horizon Theatre Company. 

9:00AM-9:30AM     Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

9:30AM-10:45AMRace and Education

  • Dr. Beverly Tatum (President Emerita of Spelman College)

11:00AM-12:00PM    Human Rights

  • Dr. Carol Anderson (Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor, African AmericanStudies at Emory University)

1:00PM-4:30PMWork on Presentations and Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)
  • La’Neice Littleton (Program Assistant, John Lewis Fellowship)

6:00PM-8:00PM      Evening Program - Trey Anthony’s "‘Da Kink in My Hair"

July 13

Teaching with the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Personal Papers

In the morning, Fellows will tour both Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University’s campuses. These tours will be followed by a presentation on religious leader and global human rights activist Rev. Dr. Howard Thurman. In the afternoon, Fellows will discuss the life and legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with Dr. Samuel T. Livingston. Led by Dr. Vicki Crawford, Director of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection at Morehouse College, Fellows will experience the rare opportunity to view the original writings and ephemera of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. via his personal papers housed at the Atlanta University Robert W. Woodruff Library Archive and Research Center. 

9:00AM-10:30AM    Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University Tour

10:30AM-11:45AM  The Life of Reverend Howard Thurman

  • Dr. Kipton Jensen (Professor, Philosophy, Morehouse College), Mr. ShakealMoore (Student, Morehouse College)

1:00PM-2:30PM       Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The Birth of a New Nation 

  • Dr. Samuel T. Livingston (Chair, Professor, African American Studies, Morehouse College)

3:00PM-5:00PM       Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers 

  • Dr. Vicki Crawford (Director of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr.Collection),
  • Ms. Tiffany Atwater (Public Services Archivist at the AtlantaUniversity Center Robert W. Woodruff Library’s Archives Research Center)

5:00PM-6:00PM       Discussion (Woodruff Library Greenspace)

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

July 14

Black Muslims and Black Power

In the morning, presentations will be given by Nasir Muhammad and La’Neice Littleton on the history of Black Nationalism, the Black Muslim Movement in Atlanta, and Malcolm X as both a civil and human rights activist. The presentations will focus on the complexities and historic consequences of the successes and weaknesses of coalition building in the struggle for civil and human rights. These conversations will provide an orientation for the evening program with Ilyasah Shabazz, daughter of Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz.

9:00AM-9:45AM       Video Seminar: Malcolm X and the Black Power Movement

10:00AM-11:00AM   Black Nationalism and Black Muslim Movement in Atlanta

  • Nasir Muhammad (CEO and Founder of Black Mecca of the South Tours)

11:00AM-12:00PM   Malcolm X, Human Rights, and Coalition Building

  • La’Neice Littleton (Program Assistant, John Lewis Fellowship)

1:00PM-3:30PM       Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

5:00PM-8:00PM       Evening Program with Ilyasah Shabazz   

July 15

Using Your Creative Genius to Bring About Social Justice

Fellows will experience a full day of understanding civil and human rights through the visual and performing arts. Presenters will consist of artists who are using their genius to act as change agents and address social ills. The conversation will take place in the historic Clark Atlanta University Art Gallery which houses the collective works of some of the leading African-American visual artists of the twentieth century and continues to exhibit contemporary works of some of the nation’s leading and emerging visual artists. 

9:00AM-9:30AM       Welcome

  • Dr. Ronald A. Johnson (President, Clark Atlanta University)

9:30AM-10:30AM     Conversation on the Life and Legacy of Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz

  • Ilyasah Shabazz (Author, Daughter of Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz) 

10:30AM-11:00AM   CAU Art Collection 

  • Dr. Maurita Poole (Director, Art Gallery, Clark Atlanta University)

11:00AM-11:40AM   Gallery Tour

11:40AM-12:00AM   Student Response to Art Exercise 

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

1:00PM-2:30PM       Role of the Modern Day Artist-Activist: Visual Arts

  • Alfred Conteh (Artist), Tabia Lisenbee-Parker (Photographer),
  • Charmaine Minniefield (Artist)
  • Joe Dreher (Artist)

2:45PM-4:00PM       Role of the Modern Day Artist-Activist: Playwright and Opera 

  • Minka Wiltz (Playwright, Opera Singer)

4:00PM-5:00PM       Spelman College Tour

  • Greetings from Jane Smith, Ed.D. (Vice President, College Relations)

6:00PM-9:00PM       Art and Jazz at the High Museum

July 16

The Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

10:00AM-2:00PM    Visit to Martin Luther King, Jr. Center

July 17

Sunday Worship Service 

Fellows will attend Sunday Service at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church.

11:00AM               Sunday Worship Services  

July 18

Leadership and Immigration

Throughout the day, Fellows will have the opportunity to hear from leading immigration advocates who act as political leaders, attorneys, or executives for some of the leading national and global civil and human rights organizations. Fellows will have an opportunity to learn of their leadership and collective efforts to improve the quality of life for members of the immigrant community in the United States.

9:00AM-9:30AM      Discussion of Mid-Program Evaluation 

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

9:30AM-10:45AM    Immigration and the Struggle for Civil and Human Rights

  • Derreck Kayongo (Chief Executive Officer, National Center for Civil and HumanRights)

11:00AM-12:00PM   Project South, Immigration Law, and Human Rights Activism

  • Adazadeh Shahshahani (Human Rights Attorney) 

2:00PM-3:00PM       The City of Clarkston, “Ellis Island of the South”

  • Ted Terry (Mayor of Clarkston, Georgia)

3:10PM-3:30PM       Complete Mid-Program Evaluation

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

3:30PM-5:00PM       Construction of Race in America Discussion and Exercise

  • “Cracking the Code” Video Clips

6:00PM-7:00PM       Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

July 19

Congressman John Lewis and Asian American Issues

Fellows will spend the morning in conversation with Congressman John Lewis at his office in downtown Atlanta. Following US Representative Lewis, attorneys, Helen Ho and Bryan L. Sells will discuss Asian American issues and civil, social, and economic rights. In the afternoon, Fellows will have the opportunity have preliminary discussions about their Action Projects and end of the program presentations. 

9:00AM -10:45AM   One-on-One Conversation with Congressman John Lewis

11:00AM-12:00PM  Asian issues and Voting Rights in America

  • Helen Ho (Founding Executive Director, Asian Americans Advancing Justice),Bryan L. Sells (Civil Rights Attorney)

1:30PM-2:30PM      Action Projects 

  • Veronica Agard (Program Associate, Humanity in Action)

2:30PM-5:00PM     “The Current State of Democracies in the US and Europe” Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

July 20

Immigration, Legislation, and Advocacy

Since 2002, the subject of immigration legislation has served as a subject of great national debate. In 2011, Georgia enacted a strict set of immigration laws covering a wide range of activities relating to daily life. Throughout the day, Fellows will hear from refugee advocates as well as Georgia legislators and grassroots activists as they discuss immigrants’ rights and the laws that fail to protect non-citizens.

9:00AM-9:30AM      Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

9:30AM-11:00AM    Georgia Immigration Law and Latino Voting

  • Representative Pedro Marin (Georgia Representative, District 96); JerryGonzales (Executive Director, GALEO)

11:15AM-12:30PM   Grassroots Activism

  • Adelina Nicholls (Co-Founder and President of the Coordinating Council ofLatino Community Leaders of Atlanta) 

2:00PM-3:00PM      Film, “Stolen Education”

3:00PM-4:00PM      Q&A

  • Dr. Enrique Alemán, Jr., (Executive Producer and Co-Writer, “StolenEducation”)

4:00PM-5:00PM      Black-Brown Coalitions

  • Joel Alvarado (Director of Community Outreach and Engagement, GeorgiaPiedmont Technical College)

July 21

Leadership and Representation: Native Americans, the Islamic Community, and Politics

In the morning, Fellows will have the opportunity to engage in conversation with members of the Native American community on culture, racial identity, political representation, education, and immigration. During the afternoon sessions Fellows will hear from representatives of the Islamic community in the areas of advocacy, religious leadership and photography. The session will close with a conversation with Former Atlanta Mayor, Shirley Franklin, on leadership and the creation of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. 

9:00AM-10:00AM    Native American Issues, Immigration, and Political Representation

  • Representative Ponka-We Victors (Kansas State Legislature)

10:30AM- 11:45AM  Native American Culture and Racial Identity

  • Ramona Big Eagle Moore (President and CEO, Dare To Soar Enterprises)

1:30PM-2:00PM      Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

2:00PM-3:00PM     Documenting the Atlanta Islamic Community through Photography

  • Rahmeek Rasul (Photographer), Imam Plemon T. El-Amin (Resident Imam,Atlanta Masjid of Al-Islam)

3:00PM-4:00PM      Discussion on Leadership and the Building of a Center

  • Shirley Franklin (Former Atlanta Mayor)

4:00PM-5:00PM      Discussion Continued

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

July 22

Contextualizing the LGBTQ Struggle through Film

Through film Fellows will experience a day of examining the LGBTQ struggle for equal protection of the law in America. These films will examine the generational struggle of these individuals and will allow Fellows to understand the LGBTQ community’s relationship to civil and human rights issues.

10:00AM-11:30AM   Film: “Brother Outsider: Bayard Rustin”

11:30AM-12:00PM   Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

1:00PM-2:00PM      Mildred Loving Case, Marriage Equality, Lorde, Baldwin, Lynch Video Seminar

  • Karcheik Sims-Alvarado (Program Director, John Lewis Fellowship), La’NeiceLittleton (Program Assistant, John Lewis Fellowship)

2:00PM-4:00PM      Film: “Bessie” 

4:00PM-6:30PM      Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

July 23

Outing to be organized by Fellows

July 24

Working on Presentations

July 25

Youth Activism and Black Lives Matter 

Fellows will spend the morning discussing structural and institutional racism via the lens of Critical Race Theory and Racial Formation. In the afternoon, Fellows will have the opportunity to hear about the historical context of youth activism in relationship to contemporary social movements. These conversations will give Fellows the opportunity to critically analyze the Black Lives Matter Movement. 

9:30AM-12:15PM   Discussing Literature: Critical Race Theory, and Racial Formation

  • Karcheik Sims-Alvarado (Program Director, John Lewis Fellowship), Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship), La’Neice Littleton (Program Assistant, John Lewis Fellowship)

1:45PM-2:15PM    Fred Hampton and Youth Activism

  • Craig McPherson (Adjunct Instructor, History, Clark Atlanta University)

2:30PM-3:45PM   Teaching Black Lives Matter

  • Dr. Samuel T. Livingston (Professor, Chair, African American Studies, Morehouse College)

4:00PM-5:00PM    Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

July 26

Justice and Journalism

In the morning, Fellows will hear from two leading civil rights attorneys about the legal challenges representing victims of police violence. Both attorneys will also discuss the successes and challenges related to the Fourteenth Amendment. During the afternoon session, Fellows will hear from award-winning journalist who covered the Ferguson demonstration in Missouri, the emergence of the Black Lives Matter Movement, and the mass shooting at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

9:00AM-10:45AM   Work on Presentations

11:00AM-12:15PM  Civil Suits and Fourteenth Amendment Rights

  • Julie Oinonen-Williams (Partner, Williams Oinonen LLC); Mario Williams(Partner, Williams Oinonen LLC) 

2:00PM-3:00PM     Documenting Social Movements via the Press

  • Ernie Suggs (Reporter, Atlanta Journal Constitution)

3:00PM-5:00PM     Work on Presentations

July 27

Race and Place

Fellows will have the opportunity to consider race, class, and education as they relate to geography in the city of Atlanta. The Fellows will have an opportunity to discuss the ways in which race and economics intersect in urban cities, and how to address closing the economic gap throughout the US and beyond.

9:15AM-10:15AM   “Gazing into the Crystal Ball of Atlanta: Race and Class in Urban Cities”

  • Mike Carnathan (Manager of the Research & Analytics Division, the AtlantaRegional Commission, and Founder of Neighborhood Nexus)

10:30AM-12:00PM   Creating Viable and Sustainable Communities using an Equity Agenda

  • Hattie Dorsey (Principal, HBDorsey & Associates LLC)

2:00PM-3:00PM      Improving the Quality of Life: Education, Health, and Public Space

  • John H. Eaves, Ph.D. (Chairman, Fulton County Board of Commissioners)

3:00PM-5:00PM      Discussion

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

July 28

End of Program Presentations

Fellows will devote the entire day to delivering their presentations.

9:00AM-9:30AM     Program Reflections

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

9:30AM-5:00PM     Presentations 

July 29

Closing of the Program

In the morning, Fellows will hear closing remarks from the National Center for Civil and Human Rights and Humanity in Action. The program will close with a talk from contemporary artist Fahamu Pecou, whose work is currently on exhibit at the Center for Civil and Human Rights. The closing reception dinner will be held at No Más! Cantina. 

9:00AM-10:00AM      Closing Remarks

  • Derreck Kayongo, (Chief Executive Officer, National Center for Civil andHuman Rights), Judith S. Goldstein Ph.D. (Founder and Executive Director, Humanity in Action), Deborah Richardson (Executive Vice President, National Center for Civil and Human Rights), Karcheik Sims-Alvarado Ph.D. (ProgramDirector, John Lewis Fellowship)

10:30AM-11:30AM    Artist Fahamu Pecou

11:30AM-12:00PM    End of Program Evaluations

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

2:00PM-4:00PM       Closing Program

  • Ufuk Kâhya (Program Associate, John Lewis Fellowship)

6:00PM-8:00PM       Dinner - No Más! Cantina